Press Releases

Press Releases

For media inquiries, contact Amanda Secor, communications specialist
Alzheimer's Foundation of America 866.AFA.8484 | media@alzfdn.org

Current Press Releases

April 22, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

OLDER AMERICANS AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE BY THE NUMBERS
Alzheimer's Foundation of America Releases New Infographic for Older Americans Month

Infographic linkNEW YORK (April 22, 2014) —It's no secret that our nation's population is aging. And, while Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are not part of the normal aging process, the incidence of these brain disorders is rising in line with the increasing number of older Americans. In recognition of Older Americans Month in May, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) today released a new, infographic offering a glimpse into older Americans and Alzheimer's disease, and the issues facing our nation now and in the coming years.

"Helping people mitigate risk factors for Alzheimer's disease has long been at the core of AFA's educational efforts," said Charles J. Fuschillo, Jr., AFA's chief executive officer. "This month, when older Americans are especially in our nation's consciousness, we want to encourage people to adopt strategies that can help them age safely and successfully."

The new infographic contains two interactive sections—one on health and safety concerns such as falls and driving, and one with educational information about Alzheimer's disease, memory screenings, and modifying lifestyles for better brain health—with links to external resources designed to help both individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders, and their caregivers.

Currently, more than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease and that number is expected to triple by 2050. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia, doubles every five years after age 65.

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About Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer's Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national nonprofit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line staffed by licensed social workers, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org, follow us on Twitter, or connect with us on Facebook.

Contact: Amanda (Hirschhorn) Secor
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

 

March 26, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

ALZHEIMER'S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA STATEMENT ON TASK FORCE'S RECOMMENDATION ON SCREENING FOR DEMENTIA

NEW YORK (March 26, 2014) – The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA), a national nonprofit organization dedicated to providing optimal care and services to people with dementia and their families, today issued the following statement in response to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's (USPSTF) recommendation on universal screening for dementia in people ages 65 and older with no signs or symptoms of cognitive impairment. While the USPSTF found adequate evidence that some screening tools have sufficiently high sensitivity and specificity to be clinically useful in identifying dementia, the group found inadequate direct evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for cognitive impairment and of non-pharmacologic interventions. Said Charles J. Fuschillo, Jr., AFA's chief executive officer:

"The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) is extremely disappointed with the decision of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Cognitive screening is a simple and safe evaluation that assesses memory and other intellectual functions and can signal whether additional testing is necessary. In fact, it has been determined that use of brief instruments to screen for cognitive impairment can adequately detect dementia. Brief screening tests can raise red flags, leading to a diagnosis of both treatable conditions and irreversible conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the lack of empirical evidence, the AFA believes that there are meaningful benefits to broader adoption of such screenings, and we are confident that further studies will validate that.

"Since 2003, AFA has provided free, confidential screenings at community sites to hundreds of thousands of people through its annual National Memory Screening Day initiative. AFA suggests such screenings for anyone who has memory concerns, who has a family history of memory problems, or who wants to check his memory now and for future comparison. While the results are not a diagnosis, they are a major first step toward proper detection of memory problems.

"Early detection of Alzheimer's disease can empower individuals and their families to take a more proactive approach to care planning and treatment and thus help improve quality of life. Individuals can take advantage of available treatments when they are most helpful, before symptoms have progressed. There is a substantial benefit to identifying a 65 year old with mild cognitive impairment who is currently in a stage in which FDA-approved medications can slow progression of symptoms and postpone costly nursing home placement. In addition, identification of those with pre-symptomatic dementia is critical for participation in clinical trials as research into promising drug therapies is taking place earlier in the disease progression.

"While the USPSTF's recommendation statement acknowledges that expert consensus guidelines support early detection of cognitive decline, its recommendation dismisses mounting evidence that there are benefits to screening. Moreover, this recommendation could discourage further research into cognitive screening if third party payers do not reimburse for this vital assessment tool.

"With the incidence of Alzheimer's disease continuing to climb to staggering heights, we cannot afford to dismiss the benefits of early detection and treatment."

About Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer's Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national nonprofit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line staffed by licensed social workers, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org, follow us on Twitter (@alzfdn), or connect with us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AlzheimersFoundationofAmerica.

Contact: Amanda Secor
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

March 10, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

ALZHEIMER'S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA STATEMENT ON BLOOD TEST STUDY

 

NEW YORK (March 10, 2014) – The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA), a national nonprofit organization dedicated to providing optimal care and services to people with dementia and their families, today issued the following statement in response to a newly published study in "Nature Medicine," regarding a blood test that could predict whether a healthy person will develop Alzheimer's disease. Said Charles J. Fuschillo, Jr., AFA's chief executive officer:

"We're excited about the prospect that this blood test offers. While much more extensive research is needed—in particular given the fact that the study focused only on individuals 70 years of age and older—this study offers a glimmer of hope for the future.

"If the study is validated, early intervention and treatment—two tactics for which AFA has advocated through its annual National Memory Screening Day initiative—could become more of the norm. Early detection could afford people who will develop the brain disorder an opportunity to, for example, participate in a clinical trial or to follow a drug treatment protocol that may help slow the progression of symptoms. It could also yield individuals with Alzheimer's disease an opportunity to have 'kitchen table' conversations about legal and financial planning, healthcare proxies and other related issues, and help ensure that their end-of-life wishes are honored.

"The preliminary findings of this study underscore the dire need for increased funding for Alzheimer's disease research. There are breakthroughs, like this, on the horizon, and we need to ensure that those working so hard to develop them have the financial resources they need to bring them to fruition."

Fuschillo recently called on Congress to appropriate $500 million in additional funding for Alzheimer's disease research and caregiver supports in the FY15 budget.

About Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer's Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national nonprofit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line staffed by licensed social workers, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org, follow us on Twitter (@alzfdn), or connect with us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AlzheimersFoundationofAmerica.

Contact: Amanda Secor
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

January 2, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

ALZHEIMER'S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA NAMES CHARLES J. FUSCHILLO, JR. TO CEO POST
Former New York State Senator to Amplify Organization's Care-Related Mission

 NEW YORK (January 2, 2014)

Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) Chairman Bert E. Brodsky announced today that Charles J. Fuschillo, Jr., an eight-term New York state senator, has been appointed chief executive officer of the leading national nonprofit organization, which is dedicated to optimal care for individuals with dementia and their families.

"It is with great pride that I announce Charles Fuschillo's appointment as chief executive officer of the Alzheimer's Foundation of America," said Brodsky. "With Chuck at the helm, we are poised to expand the foundation's services to benefit even more people at a time when AFA's services have never been more critical."

Fuschillo, who served New York's 8th Senate District, on Long Island, noted that he is ready for a new challenge. "Joining AFA as the new CEO presents an exciting opportunity to improve the lives of others and effect change in a disease state that is reaching crisis proportions," Fuschillo said.

During his tenure in the senate, Fuschillo authored more than 200 state laws, including some of the country's toughest laws related to drunk driving, as well as the state's landmark Do Not Call Registry, insurance protections for people with autism, New York State's Clean Indoor Air Act to make worksites and public places smoke free, and tools to protect consumers from identity theft. He most recently chaired the Senate's Transportation Committee, and was a member of numerous committees, including health.

Prior to his long political career, Fuschillo, a resident of Merrick, N.Y., served as the chief operating officer of a nonprofit family service agency serving Long Island and New York City.

Headquartered in New York, AFA provides education and care-related programs and services for people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, and their caregivers and families. Among its core services are a toll-free hot line, staffed by licensed social workers; training for healthcare professionals; an award-winning division to educate and engage teens; care ADvantage, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers; and National Memory Screening Day, a groundbreaking initiative that realized record participation last November. AFA's advocacy efforts have resulted in recommendations included in the historic "National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease" and the inclusion of detection of cognitive impairment in the Medicare Annual Wellness Exam.

About Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national non-profit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line staffed by licensed social workers, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org, follow us on Twitter (@alzfdn), and “like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/AlzheimersFoundationofAmerica).

Contact: Amanda Secor
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

May 14, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

ALZHEIMER’S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA OFFERS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS TELECONFERENCE FOR CAREGIVERS OF PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA
‘Care Connection’ Guest Speaker Discusses Strategies to Better Weather the Season’s Storms

 NEW YORK (June 5, 2013) – With recent tragedies in Oklahoma emphasizing the potential wrath of Mother Nature and with the summer storm season about to begin, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) today announced that its “Care Connection” monthly educational teleconference for caregivers of people with dementia will focus on “Coping in the Face of Disasters” on June 13.

The featured speaker, Janelle Christensen, Ph.D., M.P.H., will discuss the importance of adapting disaster plans for the various stages of dementia, strategies to deal with scenarios such as a person’s refusal to evacuate, tips for managing stress-induced behaviors, and what to pack in the all-important “go” kit.

Offered the second Thursday of each month from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. (ET), Care Connection is designed for both family and professional caregivers, and presents different guest experts each teleconference. To join the conference, call (toll-free) 877-594-8353 and enter guest identification number 46692951#.

It is estimated that as many as 5.1 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease. Symptoms that can include memory loss, confusion, lack of judgment and behavioral issues make people with the brain disorder more susceptible to the effects of natural disasters. Relocation to unfamiliar surroundings can result in mood changes, including depression and aggression, and wandering, for example.

Christensen, currently a program data analyst at Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth, Fla., has delved deeply into this subject. For her Ph.D. thesis, she worked with clients in their homes and at adult day programs in Florida, “listening to their stories about past storms, how they felt and what they needed,” she said. “From this research, I was able to evaluate the challenges people face and identify best practices for mitigating emotional and physical trauma.”

In 2011, as a former grants administrator at Alzheimer’s Community Care, Palm Beach, Fla., Christensen wrote an application for a grant for disaster-preparedness kits for families caring for people with dementia that received funding from AFA.

About Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national non-profit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org , follow us on Twitter (@alzfdn), and “like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/AlzheimersFoundationofAmerica).

Contact: Amanda Hirschhorn
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

May 14, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America Hosts Free Conference in New York
‘5 Boroughs Concepts in Care’ Event Offers Caregiving Strategies and Solutions

 NEW YORK (May 14, 2013) The rising number of people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers often feel alone and unequipped to handle the daily challenges the brain disorder can bring. To offset this, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) will offer a hands-on opportunity for people to gain support and practical skills at its free “5 Boroughs Concepts in Care Conference” in New York on June 26.

This daylong educational event, which will be held at the New York Marriott Marquis hotel in Times Square, will feature three “tracks” of study – one for family caregivers, one for healthcare professionals and one for people with Alzheimer’s disease or a related illness.

 Presentations by top health and caregiving experts will range from an understanding of the disease and tips for daily living to more hushed-over topics, such as heading off potential violence and how to handle inappropriate sexual behavior.

 In addition, the conference will feature various dementia-related activities, including confidential memory screenings, the “Virtual Dementia Tour”—an interactive simulation of what it feels like to have dementia, and an exhibit hall. On the emotional side, AFA will display three dozen quilt panels from its powerful and heartfelt “AFA Quilt to Remember,” and Raymond W. Holman, Jr., a Philadelphia photographer, will show insightful portraits of family caregivers.

 “Families affected by Alzheimer’s disease as well as healthcare professionals are starving for information about the brain disorder, especially as the incidence continues to climb,” said Carol Steinberg, acting CEO of the New York-based national organization. “The best way to approach this devastating disease is to not go it alone.”


 AFA introduced its “5 Boroughs Concepts in Care Conference” last year to fill the gap left by the discontinuation of the long-time annual “Mayoral Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease.” In New York state, it is estimated that more than 300,000 people are living with Alzheimer’s disease or related disorders.

 Presenters will include Paul Nussbaum, Ph.D., a clinical neuropsychologist and founder and president of Brain Health Center, Inc., opening in Pittsburgh this fall, which will take a holistic approach to wellness and brain health; Susan Glister, Ph.D., RN, renowned speaker on the disease and a founder and former executive director of the Alois Alzheimer Center, Cincinnati, the first dementia-specific facility in the United States; and Melanie Bunn, RN, a dementia training specialist for Alzheimer’s North Carolina, Raleigh, N.C.

 In addition, Molly Arnold-Gay, granddaughter of Frank Broyles, former athletic director of the University of Arkansas and author of “Coach Broyles’ Playbook for Alzheimer’s Caregivers,” will provide insight into intergenerational caregiving. Arnold-Gay spent her teenage years helping to care for her grandmother, who had Alzheimer’s disease.

 For individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, facilitators will engage attendees in horticultural, art, dance and other creative activities that showcase the benefits of social and mental stimulation. AFA will also offer respite care – supervised by professional caregivers – for people with more advanced dementia who are unable to participate in the sessions.

 The “AFA Quilt to Remember” is an extraordinary work of art that marks a moving tribute to people living with dementia and their families. Introduced in 2005, as the nation’s first large-scale dementia-related quilt, it now consists of more than 150 unique panels. The majority are embellished with photographs, sentimental mementos and love notes.

Several panels that will be on display were made in the tri-state area, including one created by clients attending the adult day program at the Sid Jacobson Jewish Community Center, East Hills, N.Y.

 “ We’re showing people [with Alzheimer’s disease] as productive people, and that is the goal of our program,” said Connie Wasserman, an associate executive director at the JCC. “These are people who just happen to have Alzheimer’s disease. We don’t define them by the disease.”  

 Attendees will also receive free breakfast, lunch, program materials and giveaways. Eli Lilly and Company, and Forest Laboratories, Inc. are the presenting sponsors of the family caregiver sessions . For more information and to register, call AFA at 866-232-8484.

About Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA)
The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national non-profit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include a toll-free hot line, educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers, and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484, visit www.alzfdn.org , follow us on Twitter (@alzfdn), and “like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/AlzheimersFoundationofAmerica).

Contact: Amanda Hirschhorn
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

April 2 , 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America Applauds President Obama for Advancing Far-Reaching Brain Mapping Project

NEW YORK, NY— The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), a leading national nonprofit organization dedicated to optimal care for people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families, today applauded President Obama’s announcement to invest $100 million in ground-breaking research that will map the human brain. The “BRAIN” (Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative, an idea that the President first noted in his State of the Union address earlier this year, is aimed at uncovering new ways to treat, prevent, and cure brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury.

Statement by Carol Steinberg, acting chief executive officer of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America:

“The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America applauds President Obama for committing substantial research dollars toward the better understanding of the human brain and for his continuing recognition of the public health crisis posed by Alzheimer’s disease.

“The BRAIN Initiative is an exciting development and a potential game changer in unlocking the mysteries of Alzheimer’s disease. This far-reaching project holds the promise of providing deeper insights into concepts such as cognitive reserve, ultimately leading to ways to treat or even prevent Alzheimer’s disease. It is just the shot in the arm that both scientists and families need right now, especially in light of flat research funding for Alzheimer’s disease and the threat of this devastating disease overwhelming more and more Americans.

“AFA’s hope is that funding for the BRAIN Initiative is the start of a pipeline of stepped-up funding for other research toward an effective treatment and cure of Alzheimer’s disease as well as for care-related support services for individuals with the disease and their caregivers. In addition to investing in larger initiatives that have the potential for big payoffs in the future, we need to continue to fund research farther along in the drug development process so that families can embrace treatment and prevention in their lifetimes.

“Bolstered by the strength of the new BRAIN Initiative, now is the time for all Americans to press forward to ensure that the goals of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease are implemented to the relief of current and future generations.”

Statement by Jacobo Mintzer, M.D., chairman of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Board, and professor at the College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina: “I was delighted by today's announcement regarding the BRAIN Initiative. Today we start a journey full of expectations and unknowns.

“Where will the understanding of brain functioning lead us? Will it be possible to understand how the brain processes information, how lesions in the brain alter cognitive networks, and how the brain overcomes them? Will we be able to intervene in the process? Will we discover how pharmacological treatments affect this process?

“Regardless of the destination, the journey will provide yet unknown scientific insight that will change the paradigms that we use today to treat brain diseases.

“The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, which has been a pioneer in establishing the development of strategic alliances to attack Alzheimer's disease, strongly supports this model of cooperation between government and the private sector. It is only through a shared commitment that our community can explore this frontier and secure solutions.”

Currently, Alzheimer’s disease, which results in loss of memory and other intellectual functions, affects as many as 5.1 million Americans and is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Advanced age is the greatest known risk factor.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national nonprofit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include counseling and referrals by licensed social workers via a toll-free hot line, e-mail, Skype, and live chat; educational materials; a free quarterly magazine for caregivers; and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484 or visit www.alzfdn.org.

Contact: Amanda Hirschhorn
Phone: 866-AFA-8484

January 3, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America Releases Recommendations to Update National Alzheimer’s Plan
‘Time to Build’ Report Declares ‘More Needs to Be Done’ to Manage Health Crisis

NEW YORK, NY —Noting that “more needs to be done” to tackle the escalating incidence of Alzheimer’s disease, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) today released a report that includes more than three dozen recommendations to build upon the current goals of the federal government’s historic national Alzheimer’s plan and take the initiative to the next level.

“Our nation has the opportunity to dig even deeper to fill remaining gaps,” said Eric J. Hall, AFA’s president and CEO, and the report’s author. “Further action on the plan’s initial strategies and additional goals and strategies can produce a more defined response to this crisis and make a greater difference in people’s lives.”

Hall said the recommendations “are not overly ambitious; rather, they are unquestionably necessary at this juncture.”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the first “National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease” in May 2012, and is charged with updating the plan annually. The plan’s overarching initial goals call for preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025, and expanding support for people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families.

The public-private Advisory Council on Research, Care and Services, of which Hall is a member, will be meeting January 14 to suggest changes to the plan. HHS is expected to release the amended version in April.

AFA’s new report, entitled “Time to Build,” measures the national plan’s progress to date as well as offers additional recommendations related to its three areas of focus: research, clinical care and long-term services and supports.

It notes that the inaugural plan “provides solid stepping stones toward substantial change” and that implementation to date of existing action steps is “impressive.” It cites, for example, greater intergovernmental agency cooperation, a new comprehensive government Web site on the disease, and the initial development of training materials.

“A firm foundation has been laid to help move the needle toward better research discoveries, better care practices and better public awareness of Alzheimer’s disease,” Hall said. “But if we want to effectively combat this looming epidemic, we need more. Now is the time to build. And given the enormity of this disease state, the federal government must lead the charge.”

Alzheimer’s disease results in loss of memory and other intellectual functions, and is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Currently, most informal caregivers are unpaid and untrained, and provide more than 80 percent of long-term services.

Chief among AFA’s recommendations related to the enormous cost borne by families, AFA urges the expansion of publicly-funded “participant-directed” programs that would allow participants to hire family members, including spouses, children and teens, as paid caregivers. In addition, the organization suggests federal tax credits for primary family caregivers; income tax deductions for out-of-pocket costs for long-term care services; greater access to government-funded home- and community-based care services such as adult day programs and diagnostic and care planning services; incentives for employers to adopt family-friendly workplace policies; and qualifying all people with Alzheimer’s disease, regardless of age, for Medicare benefits and Administration on Aging programs.

AFA also calls on the federal government to strengthen efforts to build a high-quality dementia care workforce by offering federal student loan forgiveness for professionals in geriatrics and gerontology, establishing a 24-hour call center for dementia healthcare professionals, and requiring licensure and/or accreditation of facilities that care for people with dementia.

And in an effort to address the housing needs for this vulnerable population, AFA is encouraging the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and other stakeholders to develop new, cost-effective transitional housing as a viable alternative to institutionalization.

To further promote timely and accurate diagnosis, AFA calls for initiating an awareness campaign for physicians—similar to the new campaign for the public; promoting the cognitive detection aspect of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit; utilizing federal and state health facilities as memory screening sites; replacing older memory assessment tools currently suggested by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services with newer, more efficient models; and encouraging federal support of genetic counseling for at-risk family members.

AFA’s research recommendations include establishing large-scale patient registries to facilitate clinical trial recruitment, utilizing uniform data standards to facilitate data share and FDA review of new drugs, and setting up international fund to collect revenues to support research.

“To remain relevant and responsive,” Hall said, “the national plan needs to adapt to the changing landscape in research, clinical and caregiving trends, and it must pay equal attention to quantifiable and quality care and research.”

The “Time to Build” report is posted on www.alzfdn.org.

Alzheimer’s disease currently affects more than 5.1 million Americans. The prevalence of the brain disorder is expected to escalate in line with the nation’s aging population; advanced age is its greatest known factor.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a national nonprofit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include counseling and referrals by licensed social workers via a toll-free hot line, e-mail, Skype and live chat; educational materials; a free quarterly magazine for caregivers; and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-232-8484 or visit www.alzfdn.org.

Contact: Carol Steinberg
Phone: 866-AFA-8484